Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis - Page 3
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Thread: Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis

  1. #21

    Default Re: Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis




    hi all,
    im not going to bore you with my opinions on the ep, it was good.
    i just had to say my favorite part of the ep was dewey drinking coffee, and hal smoking, and lois comes in and asks hal what is he doing, and he said dewey is drinking coffee! that part just cracked me up with laughter, i dont know about anyone else.



  2. #22
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    Default Re: Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis

    I finished my post above (EDIT: on the previous page) .

    Quote Originally Posted by CJman327
    Give it some good rating, Admin, please![IMG]images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/IMG]
    Someone might have pointed this out already, but David doesn't give the ratings, they're based on votes.

    Quote Originally Posted by yardgames
    Hal and Dewey playing catch in their pajamas in the middle of the night! That was hilarious!
    That WAS hilarious! It was more the premise than the rest of the plot that bugged me. For the first min or so while I was watching it (b/c I'd missed the first part), I assumed that Dewey had started smoking just in order to make Hal get rid of the cigarettes and then accidentely gotten addicted. That would have been much more Dewey like and would have made a much better plot. This is the kind of thing I meant when I said the writers kept missing oppurtunities.

    Quote Originally Posted by yardgames
    Since it's still (sometimes) told in Malcolm's perspective, the title often reflects Malcolm's role in the ep.
    I can think of a couple of exceptions right of the bat: Ida's Dance, Motivational Speaker.

    Quote Originally Posted by yardgames
    It probably also has to do with how clever a title they can come up with.
    That's true. That's probably it.
    In a world gone mad, only a lunatic is truly crazy -Homer Simpson

  3. #23

    Default Re: Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis

    I found this episode more dramatic than funny. The characters' motivations of the two main stories were entirely realistic and essentially serious:
    --It's practically unavoidable that Reese would be jealous of Stevie, because Stevie's intelligence has created a bond between Malcolm and Stevie that Reese can't share in. What's striking in this story is the contrast between the absurdity of Reese's behavior and the realism of his motivation. The "tables-turning" part of the story was a clever piece of writing.
    --Dewey has always had an addictive tendency. As early as Season One in "Bots and Bees" he drank himself delirious on dozens of cans of orange soda. In many subsequent episodes he's been shown with an addictive craving for the sugar high he gets from gorging on candy; in "Company Picnic" his candy binge again made him delirious. A transfer of the addiction to tobacco in early adolescence is practically assured. The treatment here takes a "like-father-like-son" aspect and hints that Dewey got his addictive tendency from Hal. It's also characteristic of Dewey's friendless isolation that he took up cigarette smoking in solitude, rather than in the manner typical of early teenage boys--sneaking smokes in some alley with his pals.

    Unlike the two previous episodes, this one had some dead spots. Lois's rambling monologues were a drawn-out joke that took forever to get to the punchline.

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis

    You make some valid and interesting posts. I never thought about that with Dewey before, thanks for bringing it up. My only complaint is that you don't post enough--we need more of your excellent thoughts!

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis

    In my opinion this was the best episode of the new season so far. I really laughed my butt off. I don't know, but those random episodes are my favorite ones, I can rewatch them again and again.
    I especially liked the scene when Hal told Dewey that he french kissed Lois in order to get some coffee taste off her teeth . It was a bit like when he told Malcolm that he wanted to have sex with lois for a last time in Reese joins the army.
    All in all, perfect episode, a can't wait for the next one.

  6. #26
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    Default Review: 7.03 - "Dewey Smokes"

    Reading this should take no longer than the amount of time it takes Dewey to smoke two cigarettes. To read more reviews, be sure to check out: http://deweysreviews.blogspot.com/

    "Dewey Smokes"
    DEWEY NYMAN - October 25, 2005

    There is a scene that is metaphoric in outlining the theme of this episode. Young Dewey is lying awake in bed with a sense of apprehension. His head on his “Herbie” pillowcase he still has after these years despite the fact he has clearly outgrown any interest in what it features. Colourful, this piece of bed-linen is themed around a toy he begged and screamed for back in the first season, yet right now it is used as platform for the young teenager to feel adverse cravings for nicotine. The use of Dewey’s pillowcase is not only a means of connecting past and present but also to suggest that Dewey is making a paradigm shift as he enters adolescence yet his environment, in the linear domestic sense has remained virtually unchanged.

    In the latest episode of “Malcolm” young Dewey is caught smoking by over zealous dad whom agrees to give up coffee to help his son overcome his addiction to cigarettes.

    Malcolm’s younger sibling has traditionally been level-headed and seen to be doing the right thing, to a point he is even an aspiration amongst the show’s young audience. We are provided with a new perspective; one of a loss of innocence when we see that this figure of near perfection can (like the rest of us) be led astray.

    It can be an initial shock to the system to envisage the smoking Dewey as the same person he was back when the show started, for the character was introduced to us at such a young age and has changed so much over the years. Knowing he smokes, we cease to picture Dewey as cute and adorable to which he was synonymous in the early seasons. This is a naturalistic move on the writer’s part in that people do change significantly when we make the transition from childhood to teenage years. He has been moved forward in life and not remained stuck in the past acting the same, which is a classic mistake other shows frequently make with their youngest cast members. Reading this, can you honestly say your personality has remained unchanged after six years?

    Although everyone grows up, we don’t all become smokers. I want to examine the likelihood that Dewey; an iconic youth of television culture would succumb to the attractions such a ruinous habit.

    He has always possessed an inquisitive mind so it is possible that he may have once experimented with one of Hal’s stashed cigarettes, thus leading to an addiction taking place. Consider also that both of his parents once smoked and children of smokers are more likely to become smoke themselves in adult life; together with the fact that Dewey does not really have much happening in his life. Not many friends to speak of. Okay, he has classmates in his “special class” so he is not the ultimate loner, but these are more associates rather than people his age, to whom he has formed decent relationships of familiarity.

    Dewey is also one that lives a sole existence for the most part, especially in the domestic arena. Most accomplishments, such as musical ability, he achieves on his own, despite a lack of physical freedom in his small home. The kid doesn’t even have his own bed, yet seldom complains about anything. He is certainly not a spoilt child. In fact he is the polar opposite. We could even go as far to say he lacks enthusiasm in certain aspects of life. So, if we are to consider his hyperactive family and lifestyle, it would not be far fetched to assume that a break in character would be inevitable.

    One thing that is not clear in this episode is the amount of time at which Dewey has been a smoker, and how exactly his addiction came to manifest itself. Two packs a day is excessive by anyone’s standards, and this doesn’t just happen overnight. For all we know, Dewey could have been smoking since the fifth season. If we look at past scenarios, he has spent a considerable amount of time alone in the garage. Would it be far fetched to have stumbled upon Hal’s stash before now?

    It would be interesting to see if Dewey is still smoking in future episodes, as such the strong habit of smoking is generally a difficult addiction to overcome. One cannot just stop in the short term. It is not only irresponsible parenting on Hal’s part that sparked Dewey’s smoking, but from the episode it is fair to say that the parent’s attempts would have failed. In the last scene between the pair, Hal is not exactly offering words of discouragement against smoking. Much the opposite; he is speaking of the crisp taste and glamorous aesthetic lifestyle associations to cigarette consumption as a means of getting even for Dewey drinking coffee. Albeit after this recent instalment, there will no longer be hoards of cigarettes for Dewey to access, but that sense of craving and nicotine withdrawal must still be inside his mind.

    To comment on the production of the episode, it is clear to see that the creators are playing it safe. Despite covering subject matter of a controversial nature, we don’t see anything that is likely to cause offence. This is not a Larry Clark production, so we never actually see Dewey smoking, nor do we see him with a lit cigarette in his hands. Besides the dialogue, the production team are using a technique that conveys a suggestive and speculative visual message of Dewey smoking: We see a discarded lit cigarette on the floor of a garage Dewey is inside, we see him emerge from a crawlspace from which smoke was escaping only seconds before, and we see young Dewey come close to lighting a cigarette before being interrupted by Hal; but nothing we see comes remotely close to crossing any boundaries.

    I finally want to highlight an ethical dilemma that comes attached with the controversial subject matter. Could the episode actually inadvertently promote smoking amongst the young audience? Is it possible that by illustrating Dewey smoke, it has watered down the issue and made the activity seemingly more normal, and is therefore a pastime that is becoming more conventional throughout youth society? I have already mentioned above that in the past, Dewey has been a character that is right-thinking to the point he can even be admired. Could young audience members, whom may not fully grasp the true impacts of smoking, wish to imitate their youth icon?

    To counter this argument, Dewey smoking was never used as a means of achieving something positive for the youngster. He doesn’t gain academic or social success as a result of his habit, nor is he viewed upon in positive light. Indeed the episode illustrates the negative impacts of smoking such as heavy coughing as a result of effecting the lungs, tired eyes and fatigue, and withdrawal symptoms which make the usually calm, friendly, well mannered and approachable Dewey, an irritable and hostile figure that is best avoided. Smoking is bad for us, and despite Hal’s words promoting the activity in an attempt to get back at his son’s coffee consumption, I am sure viewers will still recognise this by looking beyond the comedy, and be able to recognise for themselves the negative implications.

    ENDS - 1215 words

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis

    That was an outstanding review, Dewey! It was a very deep and insightful look into Dewey's character and the possible reasons behind his addiction. I really enjoyed reading it!

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis

    You know, I thought that it was rather peculiar that Dewey was smoking, but you guys really have convinced me that maybe it's not so odd after all. Darren (or Dewey, as he apparently prefers to be called when writing analyses) really hit the nail on the heat in this analysis and I pretty much agree with everything he said. One very good point he brought up is that, although there's a new production team in place this year that's bringing new life to the series, you can certainly still tell the difference beween this season and previous seasons. I don't think Linwood would have wanted to do the episode if we didn't see Dewey actually smoking (he would have thought of some fancy camera trick or something so Erik didn't actually have to do it.) It seems to me that the show is still covering controversial issues, but in less of a controversial fight. Darren, I'm curious about your thoughts on the Reese/Stevie plot; did that seem, to you, to be out of character for Reese based on his developments last year?

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey
    Consider also that both of his parents once smoked and children of smokers are more likely to become smoke themselves in adult life
    I think the opposite.
    Malcolm: Where did you get $30??
    Reese: What are you a cop?? (S2E22)

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Reese vs. Stevie Reaction and Analysis

    Samboo, you are very welcome to disagree with what i wrote. I was just using an idea from Jeffrey Schaler Phd. He claims that parents are our role models, and as children we are often inclined to imitate what they do, as we assume that they are always right thinking. [Source: Schaler, J. (2000), Addiction is a Choice, Illinois: Open Court Books.] I know its not any excuse for cause of smoking, but it is a factor, and in Dewey's case is one of many factors that together have influenced his addiction.

    @Yardgames - I found it hard to engage with the plot of Reese and Stevie. Not only was it out of character on the part of Reese, but the "super-human" Stevie seemed rather far-fetched.

    This is only my opinion, so its a matter of perspective. It could even be considered a good thing, that "Malcolm" are able to create something for everyone, but this plot wasn't for me. On second viewing of this episode, I even skipped these scenes to look deeper at the scenes with Dewey and Hal.

    @Wildcat - thanks for your kind words. I am glad you enjoyed reading it - as I enjoy writing. My intention is to write a review for all future "Malcolm" episodes.

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