PDA

View Full Version : Teachers, Classes, and Learning About the British Empire



han_keep_smilin
Nov 30, 2005, 02:04 PM
I have a teacher at school called Mr X. and everywere i go me is there it freeks me out. he is really strange.

Does anyone else have a teacher like this? if you do tell me about it i hope i am not the only one with a teacher who is stalking me.:D

admin
Nov 30, 2005, 03:09 PM
Please don't mention individual names.

yardgames
Nov 30, 2005, 04:30 PM
LOL you edited the post. At first when I read it I thought that the teacher's name was actually Mr. X. You know, like Malcolm X. I was gonna say, yeah, that is a reason to be freaked out! :D

Good to see you back again David. :)

samboo1
Nov 30, 2005, 05:01 PM
I thought the teacher's name was Mr.X as well, until i actually realised the teacher she is talking about.
Just for infomation...Mr.X doesnt stalk her, he is just coincidently everywhere Han is.
Since this thread is called teachers and we are only talking about a certain one maybe we can turn it into a proper discussion about teachers.
What do you think makes a good teacher? There's the teachers that are really strict and make you copy out of a book all lesson, there's the teachers who let you do whatever you want in the lesson and there's the ones who arent strict but still want you to listen and learn, and they make lesson's fun somehow...
I think the last kind are the best. My maths teacher is like that, and i think she is a good teacher.

yardgames
Nov 30, 2005, 05:59 PM
You call them lessons in England? Interesting, they're called classes here in America.

tjpeople
Nov 30, 2005, 06:21 PM
ARHHH! Why does the world allways think of the UK as England, i know you could be in referance to England specifically but im guessing you meant UK when you said England.

Genurally we use lessons, like 'what lessons to you have' but we also use quite often 'im in this class now' both really but i surpose lessons is used more.

yardgames
Nov 30, 2005, 06:39 PM
No, I actually meant England. Look in Samboo's profile--it says she's from England. And maybe if the same place didn't have three names, it wouldn't be so freaking difficult!

Jimmy Junior
Nov 30, 2005, 07:31 PM
LOL, I thought his name was Mr X as well - slightly off at a tangent, I used to work with a guy who knew someone who changed their middle name by depol to "Danger", just so they could say "Danger's my middle name." Sad.

When I was at school I always respected the teachers who respected me, and made their lessons (or 'classes') interesting. There was a teacher at my school (let's call him Mr B) who I had for statatory RS (religious studies); he made us watch the same film twice because he "thought there were some good points in it". He didn't know who I was and on my report card ticked all the middle boxes. He was supposed to cover our pottery class when our teacher was absent but sat outside the room doing his own thing until the head of the art department came in to tell us off for having a clay fight.

The guy's an idiot and I hope he isn't teaching any more.

Conversely my geography teacher (Mr P) was one of the strictest teachers in the school, but always made his lessons fun. He once gave half the class a detention for not doing homework (or whatever you call it in the US); instead of just writing out lines we actually learned interesting stuff about geography.

Jimmy Junior
Nov 30, 2005, 07:51 PM
@TJPeople
To be fair, when I talk about how things are done 'over here' I am referring to England, because I know certain things are done slightly differently in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

@Yardgames
'Great Britain' consists of all the countries joined by land (England, Wales and Scotland).
'The United Kingdom' consists of England, Wales, Scotland and Northen Ireland.
'The British Empire' (which has severely diminished over the years) contained all the countries which recognised the British monarch as it's sovereign, and previously included Hong Kong and India (and possibly Australia and New Zealand but I'm not too sure about those)

You could call that a history lesson, to fit in with the title of the thread ;)

samboo1
Dec 1, 2005, 02:42 AM
You call them lessons in England? Interesting, they're called classes here in America.Actually i call them classes...i dunno why i put lesson.:confused: I guess i do say that often as well, but i mostly say class. ;)


'Great Britain' consists of all the countries joined by land (England, Wales and Scotland).
'The United Kingdom' consists of England, Wales, Scotland and Northen Ireland.
'The British Empire' (which has severely diminished over the years) contained all the countries which recognised the British monarch as it's sovereign, and previously included Hong Kong and India (and possibly Australia and New Zealand but I'm not too sure about those)

That's interesting...i never knew pratically all of that!

NeCoHo
Dec 1, 2005, 05:39 AM
@Yardgames
'Great Britain' consists of all the countries joined by land (England, Wales and Scotland).
'The United Kingdom' consists of England, Wales, Scotland and Northen Ireland.
'The British Empire' (which has severely diminished over the years) contained all the countries which recognised the British monarch as it's sovereign, and previously included Hong Kong and India (and possibly Australia and New Zealand but I'm not too sure about those)

And we can't forget Briton, the name of England in the 1100's.
And the British Empire also held America at one time Jimmy, But we naughty Yanks fought back and look at us now, need I mention WWI, WWII, and how you needed our supplies over the ocean, and our men. :)

But you should have kept Hong Kong. Dang Communism.



But back on topic, I think we had a discussion on this before, never mind, but I find it neat that in the US, a lesson is what the teacher plans to teach that day, as in 'lesson plan' Just as a class is where we go to, or who we graduate with.

admin
Dec 1, 2005, 08:50 AM
And we can't forget Briton, the name of England in the 1100's.
And the British Empire also held America at one time Jimmy, But we naughty Yanks fought back and look at us now, need I mention WWI, WWII, and how you needed our supplies over the ocean, and our men. :)

But you should have kept Hong Kong. Dang Communism.



But back on topic, I think we had a discussion on this before, never mind, but I find it neat that in the US, a lesson is what the teacher plans to teach that day, as in 'lesson plan' Just as a class is where we go to, or who we graduate with.

Hong Kong was technically on lease to us for 99 years, 1898 to 1997 :D

han_keep_smilin
Dec 1, 2005, 12:01 PM
Even though some teachers are strict I think they teach better than the ones that do not bother does anyone else agree?

This does not mean i like strict teachers better :D I like kind ones much better:)

han_keep_smilin
Dec 1, 2005, 02:55 PM
my teacher is really scaring me now......

Wildcat
Dec 1, 2005, 04:44 PM
Whichever mod changed the title, I like it. :D

My teachers are professors and they don't even know my name. Not that I care though. High school was pretty uneventful too. I guess all my teachers were "average." No bad ones, but no exceptionally good ones either.

yardgames
Dec 1, 2005, 05:40 PM
You like that? It's fun thinking of new names for threads. Once I called one "A Rather Random Thread About A TV Show, Starting Your Own Country, and the Dubai Creek." I think that's the best yet. I actually had to shorten it because it was too long. :) But that's the thread that New Sealand comes from if you were wondering.

Jimmy Junior
Dec 1, 2005, 07:02 PM
Whichever mod changed the title, I like it. :D


I'm not sure about it - I thought it was a bit too specific.

btw look out for my "what interesting sci-fi books have you recently read and how ice cream is made" thread. :D

tjpeople
Dec 1, 2005, 07:09 PM
But you should have kept Hong Kong. Dang Communism.



Having recently visted HK i must correct you. HK aiant really communist, china is buit have not real power in HK, atm its basically it own little country. When britain handed it back to China it was with agreement that nothing would change in HK for about 15 years or so becuase of the amount of british people living there, and its still like that, but is gunna change soon, not sure of exact dates, but it should be interesting to see what china does.

Wildcat
Dec 1, 2005, 07:35 PM
that's the thread that New Sealand comes from if you were wondering.

I was wondering about that. That happened before I discovered this wonderful forum. :D I saw it in a thread and thought it was a typo for New Zealand. But I just read the thread you were talking about so now I know.

NeCoHo
Dec 2, 2005, 02:52 AM
btw look out for my "what interesting sci-fi books have you recently read and how ice cream is made" thread. :D

GOOD IDEA!!!

I want it.......

vinnymonster
Dec 27, 2005, 09:38 PM
:D
No, I actually meant England. Look in Samboo's profile--it says she's from England. And maybe if the same place didn't have three names, it wouldn't be so freaking difficult!

Thats because England, Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland are different countries with distinct identities. The United Kingdom is a union made up of these countries.



Thats what they told me in school, anyway, explains why our flag is called the Union Jack too.

Anyway, with all the political bickering and whinging, I like to call my homeland the UnTIED Kingdom . :D